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Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Does behavior mar art?

Below is a picture of 'no hands clapping' Brie Larson alongside Oscar winner, Casey Affleck (accused of having his hands being overly active.)

(notice Brie's non-clapping hands)

I don't know if Affleck did what he's accused of or not, but this is a recent example of how behavior outside of one's work can affect how one's accomplishments are received. My last post was about a drawing that I found to be suspiciously uncharacteristic of an artist. However, in researching the validity of the piece, I discovered more about the artist than I may have cared to. And while the verdict is not without a shade of doubt, there is a strong likelihood that a popular spanking artist known to the world as SassyBottoms and generally thought of as female is actually a Manson Family member serving a life sentence for murder.



So, my question is: If true, what will you do with your SassyBottoms pictures? Continue appreciating them, or deleting or burning them in a pyre of disgust?

The idea of a person being affected by their secret behavior is rampant in this age of social media...........where a lion-killing dentist can't safely return to his office, or where no one feels like watching re-runs of The Cosby Show. And yet, like all things in our society, there is no even application of this standard. ( The people who voted for Trump STILL support him, no matter what he says or does.) Hell, I know plenty of people who won't watch Tom Cruise movies because "he's such a jerk!" I always reply, "I wouldn't want to hang out with the guy, just like I wouldn't want to hang out with most 'stars', but name one movie he was bad in. Not a bad movie he was in, but a role that he botched." No one can ever name one. (but....yeah, he DOES seem to be an asshole.)

So is the application of disgust over behavior truly basic moral outrage, or is it tempered by something much more selfish? OR is the dismissal of accomplishment by someone seemingly guilty of improper or criminal behavior silly? If we found out that da Vinci had murdered a rival, would we burn the Mona Lisa? Should we?

What are YOUR thoughts?

31 comments:

  1. The news of Brie has been everywhere, specially since she plays a victim in the movie ROOM. (I recommend to watch). I feel like everyone has their own bias opinion at some level on their movie/art choices. For some as long as the movie is good, who cares because they are "actors" so they are playing a character, but the question is what kind of people are we investing our money in to gain all these success and fame. I think it also depends on how update the audience is, for some they did not know Affleck was accused of anything so they just clapped or cheered as he won. I feel like actors/ actress feel like they can do anything and they will still be watched by the audience. Their reputations may be tainted a little bit but on the long run everyone will forget and move on.
    -Ana

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    1. There's a logical part of me that thinks the answer in cases like this may be as simple as: "Love the art, but revile the artist." But it doesn't always work that way. (I find it hard to re-watch "The Naked Gun" movies with the same bemused reaction to O.J.'s scenes.)

      But what about you personally, Little Honey? Where do you draw your lines on this? Is there a level of behavior that can be overlooked but another level that can't? Can ALL behavior be overlooked in favor of the accomplishment?

      Tricky stuff.

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  2. I am likewise, " Lover the art, but revile the artist". I do not recall a situation in which I have been really tested myself on the molarity of the subject. Usually if a person I dislike is in something, I do not associate it unless I am given a reason
    -Ana

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    1. I think it's more reactionary in all of us rather than rational. If something "strikes a nerve" we react, if it doesn't....then we don't.

      (I have to say your one typo made me laugh: "Molarity"? I think you meant "morality" but you are so enamored of your beloved chemistry that molarity worked its way into your comment. And just how many 'moles' are in the ratio of art to outrage ;-) Just a few? Or Avogadro's number?)

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  3. My keyboard is so used to chemistry terms that it switches automatically lol
    -Ana

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  4. It really is hard to keep the artist separated from the art. The one that comes most readily to my mind is Mel Gibson. He has directed some really great movies. But, it's pretty hard for me to watch them since he went on his anti-Semitic rant a few years ago.

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    1. The thing is, Dan, there are so many! And those are only the ones we are aware of. I agree certain things just taint the appreciation of the work, but it is funny if you really stop and think about it, how often we react negatively to one such instance and then accept another which can be just as bad. Our emotions can be very arbitrary.

      I suppose another question might be: How would one react to learning that a major household convenience or bit of technology was created by a "real shit"? (Look at Bill Gates! Notorious for screwing people over and over.....but no one has tossed their Microsoft technology into a furnace over it. Even Edison was a real bastard. Why does it seem less objectionable to patronize the inventions of rotten people than to watch their movies?)

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    2. Agreed. Steve Jobs is the classic example. Beautiful products and turned a company totally around, but if you read the biography that was the basis for the recent movie about him -- just really a train wreck of a human being.

      It also points out that, as much as we like setting up heroes, pretty much all of us have feet of clay. I'm not saying that to excuse bad behavior, it's just that we put artists and athletes and celebrities up on pedestals, but in the end they are still just human beings.

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    3. I have had a zero Mel Gibson policy in place for many years. Personally, I don't want to risk being influenced in any way, even on some subliminal level by him and what he stands for.

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    4. Tomy, do you have others that you avoid?

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  5. I don't like the GSA because of an incident that happened to me in the mid-60's. Still, I buy at least one box of their cookies every year. The GSA changed their policy some years later, but in my case, it was "too little, too late" and people nowadays want to deny that they ever treated people unfairly, but it happened.

    Still, here I am eating thin mints and writing this.

    Long story short: I can watch an actor act or listen to a singer sing in spite of their crimes or shortcomings, because I admire the talent, but I always have those bad feelings gnawing at me.

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    1. Considering all of our conflicting feelings of what we should ignore and what we should rally around, does it make you wonder what we 'should' do? What is the proper course so that we don't have the bad feelings?

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    2. I'm not sure there is a "proper course."

      We have to decide that on our own. In my personal case, I understand that what happened to me is unthinkable by today's standards. People forget how divided things really were.

      In the case of the actors and artists, I watch it when comes on cable, or I listen via youtube or the radio.

      Or, in cases like Bill Cosby, I never liked his acting in the first place.

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    3. Perhaps there is no proper course, I was just thinking in light of the arbitrary angst these issues cause, perhaps there is an action that would enable us to process these things more satisfactorily?

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    4. Merry, I think you captured it perfectly, for me at least.

      "I admire the talent, but I always have those bad feelings gnawing at me." Bad feelings. I don't want them.

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  6. I, for one, will continue to enjoy my collection of Sassy Bottoms' pics without any guilt, as I find it to be a wasted emotion and something I rarely feel, even when I have reason to. Make of that what you will. Still, having said that, I wouldn't feel compelled to write him a fan letter or anything, even if I had his address (not to mention the authorities keep records of things like that) or even shake his hand if I met him in person. In fact, that would be a very good reason NOT to...

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    1. No guilt? Hell, "guilt" was the go-to weapon of choice in the arsenal of just about anyone who had a hand in raising me!

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  7. Crimson Kid (C.K.)March 2, 2017 at 1:51 PM

    The "Sassy Bottoms" issue is considerably different to me since the guy is an actual convicted murderer, associated with the Charles Manson 'family,' which certainly does negatively impact my feelings about his sweet-looking, spanking-oriented artwork.

    For people who simply have negative personal characteristics, I don't let that significantly influence my reaction to their artistry--I greatly enjoy the music of Paul Simon and Paul McCartney (both as group members earlier in their careers and as solo artists), even though both of them reportedly can be arrogant assholes in person.

    I found out a few years ago that one of my favorite modern science-fiction writers, Orson Scott Card (best known for ENDER'S GAME), has anti-gay attitudes, while it did bother me somewhat I still continued to read his novels.

    As a bit of a World War II buff, I can appreciate the wartime leadership provided by British prime minister Winston Churchill even while condemning his imperialist, white-supremacist, anti-feminist and socially elitist attitudes. Many widely-admired historic figures after all have their own 'negatives,' don't they?

    However, someone involved in personally reprehensible behavior such as sexual harassment, like Bill Cosby and Casey Affleck, that does considerably affect my response to them as actors. (In the case of Donald Trump, I considered him to be an amoral blustering buffoon even before he unfortunately went into politics.)

    Still, Tom Cruise merely acting like a jerk within his personal life, that doesn't affect my enjoyment of these words at all: "I'm a lawyer and an officer in the United States Navy, and you're under arrest, you son-of-a-bitch!" --C.K.

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    1. Why does it not surprise me that your feelings on this would be as organized and compartmentalized as your thorough reviews? It seems like you have wrestled with this and formulated your own criteria which you then apply to each situation. My experience is that most others (myself included) are much more prone to emotional responses on this.

      What about my other question? What would you do if you found out the person who created your favorite convenience or device was actually a criminal?

      Also, you mention that you regard SassyBottoms as significantly more reprehensible than Tom Cruise, yet you also mentioned in the past that you are a fan of his work.....even though you say the association makes it difficult for you. How do you resolve that?

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    2. Orson Card is another example of someone I dropped completely. In his case, once you are aware of what he is doing, he persistently promotes his horrible agenda by very cleverly weaving them into the stories and therefore into a reader's consciousness (or subconsciousness). And he is a very good writer.

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    3. Tomy, I had to look him up since I was not familiar with him. From the brief things I read he seems worthy of avoidance.

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  8. I have several pictures of F/m, as a male I have yet to experience a real spanking, looking. I spend time in the bathroom sitting on the toilet masturbating, sometimes I kneel on the kitchen floor, naked, masturbating, makes me feel really naughty and I cum so nicely and easy to clean up.
    Older women spanking younger men, women spanking males with pajamas bottoms pulled down, standing naked before a woman prior to a spanking, be taken to the kitchen, naked, for the spanking. I have to do something and so stroking my penis, slow at first, looking at the pictures, I find myself being the one over the lap and when I cum what a great feeling.

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    1. Like dancing on the ceiling?

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    2. So true,the F/m with the older woman doing the spanking, oh it feels so good, I just don't want that feeling to end.

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  9. Once I get to the space station, I shall try that!

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    1. Referencing Lionel Richie due to the "what a (great) feeling" remark.

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    2. Lionel who? The name is vaguely familiar. Oh, I'm on Chrome. Guess I can look him up.

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  10. Crimson Kid (C.K.)March 7, 2017 at 8:23 AM

    I'm still resolving my reactions to "Sassy Bottoms" being a convicted murderer (I only discovered it recently), but I still seem to be able to enjoy his artwork. (I'm in agreement that his spanked boys do seem rather girlish, in a few drawings the gender of the spankee seems ambiguous.)

    I own a few 'mini-magazines' purchased from "B.B. Publications" in the 1990s, plus some Nu-West magazines ('80s) featuring early "Sassy Bottoms" material, and I'm not going to dispose of them.

    Some gay people have claimed that ENDER'S GAME (by Orson Scott Card) is a novel they can relate to, since its child protagonist is bullied and denigrated for being different (although not in his sexuality) and overcomes that treatment to become a hero. (He 'villainizes' himself in later novels though.)

    Popular entertainers (notably actors and musicians) acting like arrogant, entitled jackasses, that's so common that I ignore it while appreciating their performances. However, I do agree that, as Paul McCartney once sang, "In their lives there's something lacking, what they need's a damn good whacking." (That's from the Beatles song "Piggies," about crass materialism.)

    So what ladies can we find to apply a paddle to the deserving behinds of Paul Simon, Tom Cruise and Sir Paul himself...?? --C.K.

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    1. I'm sure you could find at least one.

      "Paging Ms. Merry!"

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    2. In my experience, which is probably more than anybody's, she'll need more convalescing time for for her right shoulder before she's ready to take on all of those.

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