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Monday, February 22, 2021

Exposed to Art

 

I've used this before, but it's worth showing again, as I'm sure what she's flashing is too.

Today's post is going t be a little different. I'm going to do a little of what Dan does: a bit of background, a statement of the topic, and then leave it up to you all to respond with your own experiences.

Recently there has been a kind of "art-theme" going. Two different discussions here coincided with a joint exploration between Rosa and myself of potential canvas prints for our recently-repainted (in a different color theme) bedroom. We have been seriously considering 'something Cezanne'.

A top contender, but not a finalized choice.

I grew up around art. My father was a technical illustrator who painted as a serious hobby. We went to local art shows and competed for ribbons. And when I was old enough, he began to teach me and soon I was competing on a junior level. Going to museums was a common vacation trip. And eventually I went to art school (Pratt in NY) for my Masters in Fine Art Painting. ( a mistake for several reasons but I did learn a lot).

A favorite BY a favorite. Sargent's "Carnation Lily Rose".

But rather than go into life choices, I want to explore the role of art in people's lives. Obviously some live for it, others aren't moved, and most probably live somewhere in-between. What about you? What is your "relationship" with art......and by "art" I mean Art with the big "A", though not limited just to painting but any of the "visual arts"?

A classic Rothko. Modern Art is often the turn-off to many who otherwise feel open to Art in general.

Brett brought up another interesting side-discussion. I'll paraphrase it as: "when you DO seek out art, how much are you driven by subject versus execution?" Brett mentioned that he likes a blend of both ideally, but when it came to kinky art, the subject was more important. But please don't focus solely on the kinky for this topic. 

How about a Bierstadt for over that sofa?

So, for some thought-starters, besides the ones already expressed: how would you rate your knowledge of art? Do you consider yourself a person with a sense of style? What do you have hanging in your home (and for this discussion, please don't tell me 'my naked partner from a ceiling hook'. We'll save that for another day) ? LOL Do have a favorite artist and why? Do you own any of those art "table books", which one(s)?  On vacations to other cities, are Art Museums a frequent destination? How important is understanding art to you as a person and as a parent? Do you want your kids to learn about it and do you foster that interest? And basically what do you think "Art" is or should be? 

So let's see what you all have to say. I personally am very interested in seeing what you all think. 





25 comments:

  1. The point of origin for my love of art occurred when I was a freshman in college. My first LSD trip was a guided, nurtured, experience and she took me to several art exhibitions, including some primitive African stuff.

    With the perceptual boost, I saw art for the first time and ever since the veil of my ignorance was lifted I drink it in anywhere I find it. I have acquired quite a bit of original art, paintings especially and of course Aunt Kay was a skilled artist.

    Technique is not a factor for me. It's 100% about my experience of it. And I do not tire of the art covering all my walls. I love all of it.

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    1. Interesting way to open up to the art world. I never tried LSD. I do think that 'boost' can be important.....it is like a kick-start for some. I always appreciate those who buy something original. I knew someone who bought a small piece years ago that I would go over to every time I visited. It was simply THAT good.

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  2. As a close friend says of me "she has no soul". I can't. I don't do Art. Above my TV console I have a print of the text and lyrics from the musical "rent". On my bedroom wall I have framed Tee Shirts that I love but no longer wear. And on my teaching room wall I have pictures of music scores that have been decorated with drawings or superimposed against sketches of girls faces. But mostly because I like the music notes.

    Of all the examples you've shown here, the Rothko is perhaps the one I like most. I like that to me it says it can be whatever you want it to be. A window, a glass, a lava lamp before it heats up when all the coloured liquid is still settled on the bottom.

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    1. This made me chickle about the "no soul". LOL But given what you said in an earlier comment, I can't say your response surprised me. And I know plenty of people just like you in this regard. At least you have that music thing going for you. With "art" you just prefer using your ears. ;-)

      And yeah, how can you NOT love Rothko? Simply the most intense modern painting maybe besides Kandinsky.

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  3. Interesting topic today..... made me travel down memory road...
    when I was much younger I visited many museums with family - with school... it was interesting but it didn't stir a fire inside me.. I looked I appreciated I forgot.

    What did light a fire inside me was photography - black and whites - life more often the cruel side of life.

    Yet in our home - our pictures are zen themed ... shrug .. no artist of any popularity.. we purchase and hang what moves us in the moment.

    Pretty boring eh??

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    1. I can't say it's boring without seeing it. LOL And with photography, like Fondles, your art appreciation is just outside of painting, but unlike Fondles, loving photography is still appreciating a visual art.

      Even though you don't have certain things up, who are your top 3 photographers?

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    2. I'm not sure I have a top 3 ... I'm a bit weird that way.. I love a photograph.. Roger Monahan has a few I rather like.. Mieke Van Geest .. Imogen Cunningham... shrug.. it really is hard to pick

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  4. Growing up, my parents had several beautiful pieces, but I'm not exactly sure what happened to them, and I don't even remember the name of the Artist.

    Where I live now, there are no paintings,just several cutesy blocks with sayings painted on them.

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    1. I'm close enough to Los Angeles to go to the various museums, and I last went to the Getty in 2017.

      I know what I like, but the Artists vary. I have a few things I've done over the years, but mostly my works of art is fit only for the "Refrigerator Gallery."

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    2. When you said the thing about the blocks with sayings, I couldn't help but think of the very recent SNL skit with the ladies at the birthday. ;-)

      When you hit those museums (or did), who would grab your attention?

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    3. Mostly the statues and pottery.

      I'm fascinated by how other people live(d)and the things they use.

      Put me in a room full of paintings, and I about lose myself. I really want to know what is/was behind what I am looking at. Is it what they saw, or what they felt that brought forth what I see on the canvas? I want to feel it and immerse myself in it.

      I like the unexpected joy of seeing what I didn't see the first time I looked at something.Unlike people who get bored by seeing a movie more than once, I will watch movies over and over, and then see all the "Easter eggs" it holds within it, and I take delight each time I see something new. I like "AHA!" moments in my life.

      Apologies if this seems like too much said with no substance.

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    4. >>>>>>>>"Put me in a room full of paintings, and I about lose myself. I really want to know what is/was behind what I am looking at. Is it what they saw, or what they felt that brought forth what I see on the canvas? I want to feel it and immerse myself in it."<<<<<<<<

      Now that sums up a major aspect of Art: is it a visual experiment of sorts, or a message, or a story?

      I completely agree with experiencing things repeatedly in order to see more. And this had a whole helluva lot of substance, so don't fret.

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  5. I'm afraid that my attitude to art might disappoint you. My main amateur interest in life is history and I tend to look at artworks as a reflection of the time and place that they where created in rather than for their artistic merit. Having said that I do have some original art in my house, that I have happily paid for but I have met the creators of each of these and some of them were work colleagues and/or friends. I would rather have something of personal value on my walls than something that is highly artistically appreciated. But having said that, I do appreciate these works very highly.

    Prefectdt

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    1. Well Art most certainly IS a reflection of its time in history. I try to tell that to people all of the time. Art, science, politics, writing, etc. are all reflective of their times and places.

      Original art is great because it is personal and also supports those who will never make the museum scene. It's like having an amateur musician play for you or an event. It can be great and more intimate than just playing a CD of the best in that field. There's room for everyone.

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  6. I was a Graphic Arts major in college, so I took a lot of Art History classes. That said, I don't consider myself an art aficionado by any means. What's hanging on my walls is pretty eclectic -- everything from a framed Manet to a John Lennon poster.
    I don't care for Rothko, but I found the story of him sadly fascinating. His stripes used to be brightly colored, and they gradually dulled until he was painting nothing but shades of gray and black. Right before he committed suicide.

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    1. Yep, that's what he did alright.

      Which Manet?

      "Aficionado" is relative. If you took those courses you are probably much more well-versed than you give yourself credit for. And with the background, you have plenty of appreciation time ahead of you.

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    2. Banks of the Seine at Argenteuil. :-) It was a birthday gift from a friend who was a fellow art major.

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    3. I always find Manet's body of work to be a dichotomy of the sentimental and the edgy. The Banks of the Seine definitely clicks the first box. I like the rendering of the scene but something in me wants to crop out the figures on the left.

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  7. I want to answer your questions as you are taking an ART Spanko poll and I thin that is important. I'm pretty ordinary regarding ART but a big fan.
    What do you have hanging in your home McKnight, Osaka,Leroy Neiman and a bunch of East coast original not famous artists. Do have a favorite artist and why? all that I mentioned that I purchased. Do you own any of those art "table books", which one(s)? /sorry only art , no books. On vacations to other cities, are Art Museums a frequent destination? Hell yes! in Paris and south of France I drove my wife crazy as we did 10 museums in less than 2 weeks. How important is understanding art to you as a person and as a parent? It is as important as air. Do you want your kids to learn about it and do you foster that interest? I dragged me daughter to art museums all over the world. And we are members of the MFA in Boston. And basically what do you think "Art" is or should be? Just get with it and experience it. it is the personification of being HUMAN which everyone has surrendered in the MASKED era.

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    1. As I mentioned to others, original is great f you can find something that resonates. You seem to have done that.

      I consider it a wasted vacation if some circumstance prevents me from visiting any major city's art museum. I even frequent several minor museums. Princeton's is free and wonderful....now we just need Covid to disappear.

      I liked the BFA museum. A couple of interesting Sargent landscapes are there as I recall. I will say that I am spoiled by NYC. I recall walking straight through the Medieval art section while looking for it. But yeah, you have to expose the kids to it......even kicking and screaming if necessary. We don't give them the option of not learning to read, right?

      You are the rare responder here it seems with your level of passion on the subject. Thanks for adding your voice.

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  8. I grew up with art in the home as my father was an artist. His skills grew as I did and he did pen and inks, oils, watercolors, acrylics.
    Nearly exclusively landscapes including lots of old barns and seascapes of the Maine coast. He was a huge fan of Andrew Wyeth and my recent visit to the Farnsworth Museum in Rockland Maine was fascinating. I remember going to Chadds Ford, PA as a kid. I think my sisters and I had to stay in the car!
    We attended many art shows with him, we enjoyed the art and craft shows more as we would make little crafts to sell.
    I tried drawing a few times, not my thing. I did get into make pottery on the wheel. Later in my life my father got into figure sculpting in clay. Mainly erotic nudes with a sci fi fantasy look.
    Most of the art work that I have now is his work and some that he acquired over the years.
    We never made a particular effort to expose our children to art. So many other things to do, they don't have great interest or artistic talent.

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    1. Your father's early life sounds EXACTLY like mine.....to a freakish degree......right on down to Wyeth! He never did any erotic sculptures though, but then again he died young, so who knows what he'd have been up to had he lived?

      Having your father's work around is a nice legacy. I have a few of my father's pieces too. But we also spread the work around the family.

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  9. I really am kind of a philistine, where art is concerned. It's not that it doesn't move me, but I have never taken the time to really study it. I'm also not all that visually oriented. I tend to be more auditory, and I think in words, not pictures. It's probably either the cause or effect of living my life in books and in my own head. We don't have much art on the walls, and what we do have is pretty pedestrian. A Monet print. Georgia O'Keefe. I do have a couple of western themed prints by an artist named Brad Braune, I used to have one of them hanging in my office, and a politically incorrect colleague always referred to the subject as my "gay cowboy." I also have a LeRoy Nieman that I am not going to describe because it would be a dead giveaway of my identity to anyone who knows me.

    I also used to have one of the Lange ski girl posters in my garage. Loved that thing. Also, does a Farrah Fawcett poster count? REALLY loved that growing up. :-)

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    1. Watch out for strong men with donkey bones.

      I'm afraid Farah doesn't count, but the others do. So even without a heavy interest, you still managed to get some stuff up on those walls! That says something.

      I guess growing up with art has made me unrealistic in my expectations of what others do.

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    2. BTW, I forgot to note how much I have always loved that first pic with the woman flashing the Munch painting. I about fell out of my chair laughing the first time I saw it.

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